News Briefs
Business developments, technology launches and other news free to view

News Briefs

  • Integrating renewables the right way, a report from WEC +

    Renewable energy such as wind and solar are seeing explosive growth around the world. A new report from the World Read More
  • Toronto Hydro debuts new conservation program for condo and commercial buildings +

    Condo and commercial buildings in Toronto now have a new program through which they can expect to reduce energy consumption. Read More
  • Hydrofuel to release data showing benefits of renewable ammonia as transportation fuel +

    Renewable ammonia can help reduce the life-cycle costs and emissions in numerous transportation applications by more than 50%, according to Read More
  • Axine Water lands additional capital from Japanese multinational and existing investors +

    Japanese multinational Asahi Kasei Corp. is the lead investor in an $8 million Series B financing closed by Axine Water Read More
  • Ontario and Canada reach agreement on use of clean water funds +

    The governments of Ontario and Canada have inked a bilateral agreement that allocate more than $1.1 billion in combined funding Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53
  • 54
  • 55
  • 56
  • 57
  • 58
  • 59
  • 60
  • 61
  • 62
  • 63
  • 64
  • 65
  • 66
  • 67
  • 68
  • 69
  • 70
  • 71
  • 72
  • 73
  • 74
  • 75
  • 76
  • 77
  • 78

Stock Market

1 DOW 18,129.96
+9.79 (0.05%)    
2 S&P 2,139.76
+0.64 (0.03%)    
3 NASDAQ 5,241.35
+6.33 (0.12%)    

Renewable ammonia can help reduce the life-cycle costs and emissions in numerous transportation applications by more than 50%, according to findings from two studies. The results from Mississauga ON-based Hydrofuel Inc. and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), will be presented at a conference in Los Angeles next week.

Hydrofuel will be releasing the key life-cycle numbers for renewable ammonia (NH3) and other fuels at the Annual Ammonia Fuel Conference at UCLA. Ammonia is a potentially promising fuel source because it contains no carbon. Ammonia is considered environmentally friendly because its use can help reduce global greenhouse gas GHG emissions. 

The company worked with Ibramhim Dincer, a professor at UOIT’s clean energy research group, to produce the two studies. Dincer’s findings indicate green ammonia is the best alternative to fossil fuels in an extensive range of applications, and even better than most other renewables on several parameters.

In addition to reducing life-cycle costs and emissions by more than 50% in certain transportation applications, the use of NH3 can also act as a carbon free fuel, fertilizer, refrigerant, working fluid and hydrogen storage media.

Green ammonia can be produced using fossil fuels or from any renewable energy source using heat and/or electricity. NH3 and hydrogen applications have been developed for sectors including but not limited to: transportation, industrial, commercial, utility, agricultural, and the chemical industries.

Modern high-efficiency ammonia/urea plants using natural gas and other hydrocarbon feed stocks can be built alongside natural gas power plants and oil sand extraction sites. Utilizing the waste, process or low-grade heat can further provide a significant reduction of costs and emissions.

Over several years, Hydrofuel and UOIT studies have covered many aspects of the production and applications of use for ammonia. The two hold hold several international patents and patents pending including existing engine retrofit conversion and new engine designs, technologies for the production of hydrogen as a by-product, and the creation of high-efficiency heat production. 

The conference is co-hosted by the NH3 Fuel Association and the UCLA Sustainable Technology & Policy Program (UCLA-STPP).